Chinese Copy Of Vespa Declared Invalid

The Chinese design was presented at last year's edition of the EICMA motorcycle show in Milan. The design was removed after a complaint from Piaggio

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The Vespa Primavera's design was copied and presented by a Chinese firm at the EICMA 2019

Highlights

  • European Union Intellectual Property Office declares copy invalid
  • A Chinese copycat design was exhibited at the EICMA 2019 show
  • The Vespa design has been trademarked by the Piaggio Group

The Piaggio Group, the Italian company which owns the Vespa brand, has won a legal case against a Chinese copy of the design. The invalidity division of the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) has declared the design registered by a Chinese party as invalid, the Piaggio Group said in a statement. The Chinese design was presented at last year's edition of the motorcycle show in Milan, the EICMA 2019. The design was removed after a complaint from Piaggio, the company said.

The European Union Intellectual Property Office has found while taking the decision that the Chinese design "closely reproduces features" of the original Vespa Primavera model and "lacks individual character." The EUIPO invalidity division annulled the registration since it was "incapable of eliciting a different general impression with respect to the registered design" of the Vespa Primavera, and pointed out that the registration was an unlawful attempt to reproduce the scooter's aesthetic elements. Therefore it "must be invalidated," the EU body said.

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The Chinese design was registered in the name of Chen Huang, the EUIPO decision showed. The Vespa Primavera is protected by the design registered by the Piaggio Group in 2013. The design is registered as a three-dimensional trademark of the Vespa scooter and by the copyright that safeguards the artistic value of the shape of the Vespa, a style icon since 1946. According to Piaggio, the EUIPO case was part of its "wider activities against counterfeiting" undertaken by Piaggio for years. More than 50 trademarks registered by third parties have been cancelled in the last two years.

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